An analysis of the effects of the increasing world population and the possibilities of environmental

Today, citizens of less developed countries outnumber those of more developed countries 4.

impact of population growth on environment ppt

Such urban catastrophes could become more common. In fact, if current rates of forest clearing continue, one-quarter of all species on Earth could be lost within the next 50 years.

Human population and environment notes

Despite a wide range of regional variation, the trend of urbanization is apparent in every major world region see Figure 1. Essentially, it is what is happening within those populations—their distribution density, migration patterns and urbanisation , their composition age, sex and income levels and, most importantly, their consumption patterns—that are of equal, if not more importance, than just numbers. Developing countries tend to have higher birth rates due to poverty and lower access to family planning and education, while developed countries have lower birth rates. But East and South Asia are likely to have the fastest growth rates in the next 30 years. As such, both attention to demographic issues and the development of sustainable production and consumption processes are central responses to the processes involved in global warming. Research suggests that temperatures have been influenced by growing concentrations of greenhouse gases, which absorb solar radiation and warm the atmosphere. Environmental pressures can be greatest at the lowest and highest income levels. This enables them to enjoy the products without having to deal with the immediate impacts of the factories or pollution that went in to creating them. What does climate change mean for the well-being of human communities around the globe? The consumption of oil, natural gas, and coal increased dramatically during the twentieth century, as seen in Figure 1. An Array of Impacts The IPCC has already described a variety of potential climate change impacts on human communities, without taking into account population trends. And urban land prices are much higher because of the competition for space.

On a country-wide level, economic development and environmental damage are also linked. Debate about the actual human carrying capacity of Earth dates back hundreds of years. More clothes, more gadgets, bigger cars, bigger houses—consuming goods and resources has big effects on our planet.

Impact of population growth on environment pdf

If climate change leads to more frequent and intense storms and floods, high-density population centers will be among the most exposed. Certainly the members of the next generation, the majority of whom will be living in urban areas, will judge us by whether we were asking the right questions today about their urban environments. We need to step back and re-examine what is important and actively find ways to reduce the amount of resources we consume. There are many who believe that if we do not find ways of limiting the numbers of people on Earth ourselves, then Earth itself will eventually find ways of doing it for us. Less developed countries are already making a variety of demands for compensation, a movement likely to gather strength as climate change continues and its effects are felt more strongly. For example between and , Japan's proportion of people over 65 grew from 7 per cent to more than 20 per cent of its population. Environmental Effects of Urbanization Urban populations interact with their environment. Even in areas where fertility rates have declined to near replacement levels 2. On the other hand, older individuals are also more vulnerable to cold weather, so a warming trend in colder latitudes could decrease winter mortality rates, particularly in countries such as Russia. Contact Urbanization: An Environmental Force to Be Reckoned With Human beings have become an increasingly powerful environmental force over the last 10, years. At present, the global population has both the largest proportion of young people under 24 and the largest percentage of elderly people in history. While some view large, rapidly growing populations in developing regions as the primary culprit in environmental decline, others focus on the costly environmental effects of overconsumption among the slowly increasing populations of the developed nations. By , the percentage had increased to nearly half 47 percent. Two Specific Areas of Population-Environment Interaction: Global Climate Change and Land-Use Patterns Two specific areas illustrate the challenges of understanding the complex influence of population dynamics on the environment: land-use patterns and global climate change. It took until for us to reach 1 billion people.

Contact Urbanization: An Environmental Force to Be Reckoned With Human beings have become an increasingly powerful environmental force over the last 10, years. Bythat figure was 54 per cent, with a projected rise to 66 per cent by What does climate change mean for the well-being of human communities around the globe?

Population and environment relationship

On the other end of the spectrum, those with the highest incomes consume disproportionately large levels of resources through the cars they drive, the homes they live in and the lifestyle choices they make. But national research is too coarse for the environmental improvement of urban areas. At present, the global population has both the largest proportion of young people under 24 and the largest percentage of elderly people in history. And by the UN estimates that there will be According to one estimate, population growth will account for 35 percent of the global increase in CO2 emissions between and and 48 percent of the increase in developing nations during that period. Second, migration shifts relative pressures exerted on local environments, easing the strain in some areas and increasing it in others. This debate, however, presumes a one-step solution to the complex problems created by population pressures on the environment. Cloudiness and fog occur with greater frequency. Many towns that grew up near rivers have succeeded in cleaning up the waters they befouled with industrial development. Taking shorter showers, saying no to single-use plastics, buying less, recycling our waste and reviewing our mode and frequency of travel may seem trivial, but if millions around the world begin to do it as well, the difference will begin to add up. Essentially, it is what is happening within those populations—their distribution density, migration patterns and urbanisation , their composition age, sex and income levels and, most importantly, their consumption patterns—that are of equal, if not more importance, than just numbers. The reverse is also true—a reduction of the technology factor by 50 per cent would not necessarily lead to a reduction in environmental impact by the same margin. This is an understandable fear, and a quick look at the circumstantial evidence certainly shows that as our population has increased, the health of our environment has decreased. They will want to know whether we funded the right research to address those questions. The ecological footprint is a standardised measure of how much productive land and water is needed to produce the resources that are consumed, and to absorb the wastes produced by a person or group of people.
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Population and Environment: A Complex Relationship